@voyou Things were looking up when I persuaded my colleague to add the Girls Aloud Christmas record to the office playlist… https://twitter.com/i/web/status/940692523084931072 12 Dec 17 Reply Retweet Favorite

The internet didn’t kill newspapers; newspapers killed newspapers

I didn’t include American newspaper readers in my earlier credulity index because, hilariously, American newspaper readers are not merely credulous, but adulatory. Hence their mistaken belief that there’s something still alive for the internet to kill. On the contrary; if the internet can destroy the rotting corpse that gives off the kind of stench embodied in this Washington Post editorial, so much the better. When one republishes journalistic conventional wisdoms which anyone paying attention would know to be false, at what point does laziness become indistinguishable from lying? E.g.:

claims such as those published by the British journal The Lancet that American forces slaughtered hundreds of thousands are the real “attack on truth.”

Except that the Lancet study looked at excess mortality, it was never about whether these people were killed (still less “slaughtered”) by American troops. Or,

In Afghanistan, Wikileaks appears to have put the lives of courageous Afghans at risk, by identifying them as American sources.

A claim conveniently refuted by the Depatment of Defense.